• December 17, 2014

Nikon D750, some small reflexes and differed simulated errors

Cameras, like any other device out there, can be damaged. They can even leave the factory with a defect, though it is conceivable that there are sufficiently stringent quality controls so that the least faulty items possible reach the market. But, it’s okay; it can happen from time to time. This happens even in the best families. Today there are some black pixels, yesterday could have been a light filter and tomorrow some spots on the sensor.

Nikon D750

It is also true that the hysteria that is often caused by these failures in social networks has little to do with its real impact. Because, when it comes the moment of truth, the number of cameras that are sent to technical support is still a really small percentage of the total units sold and against the theoretically affected. Meaning that if everyone who speaks of these faults in the forums really had the camera in question in their hands, possibly the staff at Canon, Nikon and company would be lighting cigars with $500 bills instead of having to hear from your constant pestering, you guys. Or even from me, for that matter.

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  • December 16, 2014

Best Monitor for macbook Pro and Mini/Air 2015

Because of Apple PCs’ excellent screen, the presentation of color gradation, hue, and contrast is much better than that of traditional PC computers. Therefore it is the main choice for many professional video and photograph editors. In particular, the recent launch of the Apple MacBook Pro and MacBook Mini with retina screens further established its position of having the professional user in mind. The only drawback is that macbook pro’s 13 or 15.4-inch screen is too small. In fact, the MacBook Air only has an 11.6-inch screen. If you usually just use Mac to browse the web, screen size it is not so important; but for those who run complex software (such as Xcode or Photoshop), the MacBook’s screen cannot cope with all the windows. Users will need to keep pressing Option-Tab to switch between windows. An external monitor allows you to have more display space to help you get the job done more efficiently.

http://img.thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/monitor-for-mac.jpg

It is worth mentioning that an external monitor not only means a larger display space, but there is also some software specially optimized for multi-display software (such as Aperture and iMovie) that allows users more convenience. For example, if you use iMovie to edit video on a single display, the movie preview windows will be pushed to the upper-right corner of the screen by other windows. If you have two monitors, you can use one screen exclusively for the movie preview and put the other windows on another monitor.

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  • December 11, 2014

White Balance: A basic tip but also unknown to many

White balance is a very useful setting that shows the correct color reproduction, but we commonly use the white balance set in automatic whatever the situation, which many times it gives us an unexpected result or even unpleasant for some people.

The white balance must adapt itself to the situation that we want to handle. Here are 2 photographs; in fact they are the same, only that in one of them we have a different white balance to the other one.

Basically we are helping the camera understand what type of lighting is being received in the lens and then in the sensor to capture the image, we will decide if we let the camera detect the lighting (Automatic) or if we have artificial lighting such as FLASH or Daylight, Cloudy, Shade, Tungsten, Fluorescent, and Custom.

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  • December 10, 2014

Sony puts into circulation the Alpha 7 II Camera

The Sony Electronics camera catalogue continues to grow with new models. In this case we are talking about the Alpha 7 II, a camera model that is also known as α7II and with the model name ILCE-7M2. It presents itself with a series of advanced characteristics with the intention that the users can benefit themselves again from technical elements of interest, like a five-axis stabilization system.

Sony a7 ii

The stabilization system that this mirrorless camera provides allows its users to take pictures under any type of situation, no matter the camera movement. The image quality is always guaranteed to be elevated and without imperfections. It is a feature that is already frequent in Sony technology which is even more remarked in this model which, on the other hand, has a 35 mm and 24.3 megapixels full-frame sensor.

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  • December 9, 2014

Sigma goes out on a limb, considering the development of a Foveon full-frame sensor

The folks at Imaging Resource have interviewed Kazuto Yamaki, executive president of Sigma. And the truth is that he’s dropped a few interesting pearls that let us intuit where the company–one of the main manufacturers of multiplatform lenses on the market–is going.

Though Yamaki affirms that he can’t foresee information about the products Sigma will launch in the future, he acknowledges that many users have asked him to work on a camera similar to its de Quattro but equipped with a Foveon full-frame sensor. And, in the face of all this demand, he’s said that Sigma’s seriously considering this idea.

According to Yamaki, applying the architecture of the Foveon sensors that, as you all know, lack the Bayer color matrix used by conventional sensors, to a 35-mm sensor poses big challenges. Without a doubt, this is very good news, above all after finding out how good the 4th-generation Foveon sensor in a dp1 Quattro looks on paper.

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  • December 9, 2014

Is Sigma planning to launch lenses for Fujifilm’s X Series?

Even though the quality of Fujinon’s lenses is superb, many of us would like to see other companies seriously consider the X Series a system to work on and make more affordable lenses available. Though we’ve already seen interesting manual lenses from other companies like Samyang, the best news would be to see the two main "third parties" for reflex cameras, Tamron and Sigma, stepping into the Fujifilm universe.

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We learned through Fujirumors of a video interview of Kazuto Yamaki, CEO of Sigma, conducted by the Italian website fotografia.it. In the fifty-minute long interview, Yamaki discussed his production philosophy, technological advances in optical manufacturing, and future product launches of lenses. On this last point he let slip that, despite centering his production line on objectives for reflex cameras, he has a great interest in mirrorless cameras, even though the development of new lenses would require lots of time and despite the limited resources his company has available. For that reason he’s expressed the importance of demarcating his target audience: the amateur photograph with experience who needs a mid-range product. With all surety, Fujifilm’s X Series could fit very nicely in the Japanese company’s expansion plans, now that the horde of Fujifilm photographers is much more visible.

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  • November 29, 2014

Canon EOS 70D vs 7D vs 7D Mark II, what’s the difference?

If we had to choose a newly released camera that had the best new features, our favorite would probably be the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. Regardless of whether the camera is a stroke of genius or a failure, Canon has the largest customer base and many customers have been pining for a new APS-C-Flagship.

http://img.thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/canon-eos-7d-mark-ii-special1.jpg

When reviewing Canon’s offerings, there are two cameras to which the EOS 7D Mark II can be and should be compared: The first is of course its predecessor, the EOS 7D, whose owners are asking themselves whether the upgrade the next generation is worth it. Also, 70D model, which can be purchased for 999 dollars less than the 7D Mark II, must be targeted for comparison. Let’s see which cameras win on paper:

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  • November 28, 2014

Sony A7 II, the first Full Frame camera with stabilizer on the body.

Although previously rumored, Sony just presented –by surprise, exclusively in Japan- its new A7II, provided with a 24.3 Mpx Sensor. The first in 24 x 36 mm to have stabilization on 5 axes. We offer the first pictures of this new 24 x 36 mm with E mounting and “Olympus style” 5 axe stabilization.

The availability of the new A7II from Sony is announced for December fifth. The stabilization –which has been indicated to offer attenuation capacity of up to 4.5 steps- it’s for five axes and it is offered “for a wide variety of objectives” which gives us the understanding that we can also set the focal by hand to be able to make shots and recordings with classical objects and for cinematography.

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  • November 26, 2014

Best Monitor for Photo Editing and Photography 2014

If photographers to digital, you will need a computer and a monitor to see your photos, in order to evaluate or retouch them. And if you want a job well done, as often happens in photography, you can’t rely to a monitor any but you have to choose with care.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61LwoQtN97L._SL1024_.jpg

Does this mean to know how to decipher new mysterious acronyms and compare technical characteristics that seem to be made to be covered only by an engineer.

Of course, you can find monitor extremely costly, designed for professionals who can give background to pockets more capacious, and luckily, there are affordable alternatives that are, in any case, a leap in quality compared to the monitor based on a laptop or a desktop computer.clip_image001

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last comments ...
Nuno Oliveira
Nuno Oliveira

I really apreciate all these information, acording to your recomendation would you buy the Dell UltraSharp U2412M ? it is …
Refit
Refit

Thanks, this is useful. However I don't understand how Dell 2412M is in your list of best buys. It goes …
gat
gat

are you sure it's an ASUS VG248QE not an ASUS PA248QJ? VG is a TN panel, while PA is the …
Tobias
Tobias

Very well done article,it really covered everything I needed to know. I've looked around and bought the Dell UP2414Q from …
Shelly
Shelly

What is your opinion about using a Samsung 32" 5203 LED TV for editing?

  • November 22, 2014

Nikon D750 vs D810 vs D610 vs D4s vs DF, What’s the difference?

Full Frame: Nikon’s bold gamble

When Nikon announced D750, two things happened. First, some slowdown was noticed amongst buyers of D810, of which a quite significant number would have waited a little more to invest in a D750 and by the way saved 1000 dollars in price difference. I can understand them, it makes sense even if, a closer examination shows that Nikon D810 has some specificities that D750 does not have; we will get back to this. Then, and strangely enough, some have thought that the launch of D750 marked the end of Nikon D610. And that frankly, I do not buy for a second, I rather believe the opposite. I think that with the launch of D750, Nikon has firmly established its range of digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex), taking up the challenge of full frame. Personally, this range does holds up, up to four times better. Except for Nikon D750, I have used all cases of the Nikon full frame range during long work sessions. Just yesterday, I was working on pictures taken with Nikon D610 and I was captivated by the image quality, dynamism and sharpness. Last July, during an interview, I was asked what would be my advice to a young professional photographer wishing to start using the Nikon range and I answered without a moment’s pause, Nikon D610. My answer might be different today with the announcement of Nikon D750, but nonetheless, each Nikon case belonging to the full frame frame range has its own assets. It is impossible to contrast one with another and difficult to compare them. Each reflex has its target and its customers it will match. Following is a brief overview of the Nikon 24*26 range, but first a basic question. Why choose a Full Frame?

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Why a full frame format DSLR?

Photographers from Argentina (mentioning no names) would look at you in a funny manner if you were to ask them that question. This is because, in olden days, you see, the film was not cut into pieces, a SLR (single lens reflex) camera was 24*36 and that was it. When the digital showed up, there were contingencies and technical requirements which made it more economical and less costly to manufacture sensors that are not full format. In the beginning, Nikon has delivered DX sensors with a conversion factor of 1.5. Canon, on its side, has made APS-C sensors on its amateurs range (conversion factor of 1.6) and even APS-H (conversion factor of 1.3) on some SLR of the Pro range (e.g. EOS 1D Mark IV). Some have seen in the non full frame sensor a major advantage. Indeed, an optical of 200mm behaved like a focal of 320mm, all this with the help of APS-C sensor alone. But what was interesting upstream proved more difficult in the other direction. It was not wise enough for a 16mm to become a 26mm. Full format also affects other parameters such as the depth of field, the quality of the image and its dynamics and leads to a more demanding range of optics.

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last comments
Jozef
Jozef

As a Nikon D3s shooter I was about to choose D810 for a second camera for weddings. Well since the …
Spanky
Spanky

I think we need to seperate our love and passion for these truly more capable devices, from our all to …