• May 10, 2017

Nikon D5500 vs. D5600 vs. D7200 vs. D3400, what’s the difference?

We spent two weeks field testing the Nikon D5600 which was more than enough time to get acquainted with all of the features of this Nikon reflex camera designed for amateur photo enthusiasts.

The Nikon D5600 is an APS-C reflex camera which fills the gap between the limited entry-level D3400 and the professional D7500 model which is more ergonomic, but also more expensive.

As a result, the Nikon D5600 occupies a prime position within the Nikon DX product line and is geared towards amateur photographers who are looking for a powerful camera, capable of taking high-quality video sequences without the need to invest as much as it would cost to purchase one of the higher category D7200/D7500 or D500 models.

Nikon D5600

The device equipped with the Nikon AF-P 18-55mm f/3.6-5.6 G ED VR zoom

As with all the other tests, I conducted the testing of the Nikon D5600 in different shooting conditions. I am giving you my personal opinion after having tested the device and I am presenting a selection of the photos taken during testing.

Presentation of the device

The Nikon D5600 has taken over for the Nikon D5500. This new version of Nikon’s amateur photographer reflex camera only adds one new features: SnapBridge – which allows for the automatic transfer of photos to a smartphone as well as automatic geo-tracking. As with the Nikon D3400, this upgrade is a modest one.

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  • April 11, 2017

The 4 Best Wide-angle lenses for landscape photography

In photography, after the camera, the most important piece of equipment is the lens. With the passage of time, serial lenses fall short on our cameras. Everyone (or almost everyone) has seen us take a big picture of a magnificent landscape and thought: my camera doesn’t do that, why? That is where the need for a new lens arises. In other words, we want new optical experiences and the best way to do this is by changing our lens. A wide angle is an interesting option to start capturing all kinds of landscapes, architecture, interior scenes and even portraits (although not as common). However, today we aren’t here to tell you what a wide-angle lens is, what it’s for or how to use it. This post is here to list some of the best targets for landscape photography.

NIKKOR AF-S 14-24mm f / 2.8G ED: Nikon’s best wide angle zoom

NIKKOR AF-S 14-24mm f / 2.8G ED

We can almost certainly say that it’s the brand’s best lens. Even with its variable focus capability it maintains impressive sharpness at the corners using very wide openings. Many experts claim that 14mm and f/2.8 is still the Nikon’s best fixed focal length lens. In short, it’s excellent for full frame and APS-C cameras (with trim factor).

Its viewing angle of 114º at 14mm allows it to capture large portions of the scene and always maintaining optimum quality. We’re talking about a Nikon G-series lens, with nanocrystalline coatings and impressive sharpness.

With all these wonders, there are a couple of points in which this lens suffers. The first is that it’s very big and heavy. The second is that, like almost any good wide angle, it does not allow the use of filters, but instead requires a system of special size filter holder which is very expensive. The third, although understandable, is its price: 1896$.

Canon EF 14mm f / 2.8L II USM: the trophy of the Canon Wide Angles

Canon EF 14mm f / 2.8L II USM

The first version of this 14mm was already excellent, and Canon wanted to reach for the stars with the second, correcting some of the sharpness aspects. Belonging to the Canon L series, it’s a lens designed for professional photographers with magnificent potential.

According to Canon, this lens offers "a perspective superior to human vision," referring to its 114º viewing angle. A wide range accompanied by aspherical lenses and low dispersion to minimize any aberration. It also features an optimized focusing engine and the brand’s excellent Super Spectra coating.

For its part, it suffers from the same ‘disease’ as the Nikon 14-24mm, it doesn’t not allow filter coupling to protect such a costly lens, something that’s scary for any photographer. Its price is 2,099$.

Irix 15mm f / 2.4: Blackstone and Firefly: premium quality at a price

Irix 15mm f / 2.4

If there’s something to emphasize about the Irix 15mm lenses it’s that their features and specifications are those of a premium lens that normally exceeds 1500 dollars. It’s one of the things that’s surprised the many users of Irix. Contrary to what you may think, this series of advantages and innovations is showcased in the 600$ Blackstone version and the tempting 400$ Firefly version. They are available for Canon, Nikon and Pentax; And there’s a Canon adapter for Sony E on the way.

In contrast to other lenses of the same type and others on the market, the Irix 15mm incorporates innovations not seen in others: focus locking ring, rear filter slot, 95mm thread for circular filters, UV reflective marks. and special sealing, among others.

Without going further, in the prestigious magazine Digital Camera, in a comparison of 10 other wide-angle lenses, it was awarded the best price-quality award among all lenses, including Zeiss, Sigma, Tamron or Samyang and other prestigious lenses.

Samyang 14mm f / 2.8: rough polished quality

Samyang 14mm f / 2.8: rough polished quality

The Samyang 14mm f / 2.8 is like a teenager who wants to grow up quick. While it has great quality and value for an angular lens, it still lacks some aspects to be able to be labeled ‘premium’. It is, in fact, a very good alternative for its price and its characteristics, but its performance is far from the previous lenses, especially the Irix 15mm, whose price is practically the same.

The great advantage of the Samyang 14mm is its value for having such good features, such as its f/2.8 aperture or its ability to use almost any camera mount (Nikon, Canon, Sony, Fujifilm, Olympus, Samsung, etc.).

Obviously, there are many other lenses for landscape photography, we didn’t want this to become an innumerable list but rather to highlight some for their value for the money. With the arrival of spring time, we are some of the many who go out to look for the new colors and sensations that springtime landscape photography has to offer. We hope that one of these lenses has inspired you.

Read More:
Best DSLR Cameras For Beginners
Best travel Compact cameras
Best Lens for Nikon D3400
Best lens for Nikon D7200

  • April 9, 2017

Best lens for Nikon D7200

Photography for beginners: DX format lens

Although considered an SLR camera in the top-end flagship class, Nikon D7200 is still an APS-C, using a DX format lens which features both high-quality and affordability, so it is well attuned to family users in the group of new-comers to photography who have no intent to upgrade to Full frame camera.

16-85mm or 18-140mm Kit lens

As a necessary tool for this group of users, Kit lens has a frequently and widely used Zoom range, and one lens of this type, Nikon AF-S DX 16-85mm F3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR, is a DX format lens for daily applications, offering good capability that can even match Nikon “gold ring quality”effect to some extent, and has a very good imaging quality in the Nikon Kit lens family. With an equivalent focal length of 24-127.5mm, it can take large-scene landscape photos in the wide-angle end as well as distant-view pictures in the Telephoto end. (See current price and user reviews on amazon)

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last comments
Wilson
Wilson

Thanks for a such useful information

  • March 20, 2017

Canon EOS M10 vs. M3 vs. M5 – Comparing the Mirrorless Cameras with EF-M Lens Mount

When it comes to mirrorless cameras, Canon has long been in the race with one foot constantly on the brake. There was no flagship model, a very limited selection of lenses, and probably a lack of motivation on Canon’s side to really make an impression on the mirrorless-market.

Since the introduction of the EOS M5 however, these notions seemed to have been overcome. The camera is a worthy opponent to the it’s rivals by Sony, Fuji, and co.

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  • March 16, 2017

Fujifilm X-T20 vs. XT2, what’s the difference?

First announced in January 2017, and available since March, the Fuji X-T20 is Fujifilm’s latest APS-C hybrid. It completes the X line of products which also includes the X-T2 and the X-Pro2 and it replaces the Fuji X-T10 which was released in June 2015.

This new release serves as a good opportunity for us to revisit the strategy behind Fujifilm’s line of products. What is the difference between the X-T20 and the X-T2 – from which it has borrowed many of its technical characteristics?

The X-T20, a mini X-T2?

Without yet having been able to test the X-T20, we can already say that its case makes it seem like a small version of its larger brother – the X-T2, just as the X-T10 was to the X-T1. It reuses the same sensor: the APS-C X-Trans III with a 24,3 Mpx resolution – with no low-pass filter, accompanied by the latest image processor – the X Pro. Moreover, this is the processor used in the X-Pro2 and the new X100F.

X-T20

Fuji has harmonized its whole X product line by using the same image processor in all of its models: the X100F, the Xpro2, the X-T20 and the X-T2. By doing so, a photographer, going from one model to another, will always end up with the same image. This might seem like an insignificant detail, but for a photographer who uses several devices, knowing that the image will always be the same is a real advantage.

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  • March 15, 2017

Canon G7X vs. G7X Mark II vs. Sony RX100 III vs. RX100 IV vs. RX100 V vs. Panasonic LX15: The Professional Compact Cameras Comparison

Should I get the Canon G7X Mark I or Mark II, or a Sony RX100 III? Or maybe even a camera that supports 4k video shooting? If so, the Panasonic Lumix LX15 or Sony’s RX100 IV?

Are you asking yourself these questions? Me too. That’s why I have tested all of them.

I personally owned a Sony CyberShot DSC-RX100 III and loved it. The only drawback being that I managed to break it. I replaced it with a Panasonic Lumix LX15.

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  • December 5, 2016

Best travel Compact cameras 2017 Recommendation

Compacts, are cameras with a non-interchangeable objective. Usually it’s a zoom objective, but there are some exceptions represented by compact cameras with fixed focal length. As their own name says, they have some pretty small dimensions and weight (even if there’s some exception), are easy to transport, even if, actually, the size can be pretty variable and there are very small ones and, at the same time, ones that are not really pocket-sized at all.

Until recently, it was easy to define compacts as cheap cameras, with small sensors and, consequently, with a low image quality, especially with poor light, but today it’s not like that anymore. Market has deeply changed and most of the people take pictures through smartphones they have in their pocket or bag, even those who never thought about taking pictures before. Nobody wants to buy a compact camera to take pictures anymore. This, made these cameras, that some brands don’t even have available anymore, actually disappear from the market.

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  • November 30, 2016

Best Bridge Camera recommendation 2017

Some cameras with a SLR appearance are, maybe improperly, classified in this way, even if in some cases they have a slightly smaller size, and use some non-interchangeable zoom lenses. They also offer an electronic viewfinder and the opportunity to work in Shutter or aperture priority mode or manual mode, along with an automatic program.

Until recently, bridges had some very wide range zoom lenses, used same electronics as the basic compact cameras, and small sensors, whose size was usually 1/2,3”. This was the only possible way to build some lenses that offered up to 80x focal ranges, without having enormous dimensions and not really affordable costs. The image quality of these bridge cameras is not different from the basic compact cameras’ one with small sensors, but low when there’s not much light. Moreover, the use of a lens with such a wide focal length is very arduous, due to its low luminosity, which often constrains to shoot with pretty long intervals, getting blurred pictures, or to increase the sensitivity pretty much and getting pictures with a high amount of noise. The quality of these lenses is usually low, especially setting the max focal length value. Even the operating speed isn’t that high, so this results in shoot delay, not really quick and sensitive autofocus, slowness when saving pictures, difficulty when following the subject with the viewfinder for multiple shoots.

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  • November 25, 2016

Canon 80D vs Nikon D7200, What’s the difference? Which is better?

Canon 80D vs Nikon D7200

Like in football, the photo has its classico, in this case, the confrontation of the two famous DSLR brands, Canon and Nikon. The recent release of the Canon 80D of Canon is the perfect opportunity to organize a duel with the latest Nikon D7200 (released almost a year ago…).

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  • October 26, 2016

Guide To Buying the Best External Flash 2017 For Your Nikon/Canon DSLR camera

If you already bought your ideal SLR camera, you practiced with it, you dared to leave behind the manual mode, and you made your first steps in portrait, you’ve probably passed from the “The flash fires on it’s own and does what it wants but it’s ok” phase to the “the flash fires on it’s own and does what it wants and I hate it” phase, or eventually to the “i just block it and forget it exists” phase. Well, I wrote this article because I’ve gone through those phases. Through all of them, but the truth is that not all flashes are created equal, built in flashes do their function the best they can but luckily there are other alternatives that will make you believe in them again.

Flash

Now if you’re already in the second chance phase, you have probably gone to the internet in search of the best brands, options, user comments, etc and you probably were overwhelmed by all that nomenclature and names worthy of physics nobel prizes (Can’t they really find simpler names?) and you have no idea where to start. Well, do not despair, we’ve all been through it. The trick is to simplify (like when we compose a photograph) and focus on knowing what you want, what acronyms have been devoted to name the thing you want, and not paying attention to what you don’t need.

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