• May 17, 2017

RGB, sRGB, Adobe RGB, what’s that?

If you are interested in digital photography (which is most likely the case if you are reading this article), then you will probably already have heard the term RGB being used. We would like to give a brief explanation of what these 3 letters mean and what importance they have for you as a photographer.

If you have never heard of RGB, simply open a photo in your favorite image editing program and look at the title bar: you will see these three letters somewhere among the text. What does this mean?

RGB

Let’s begin with a definition: RGB corresponds to the additive synthesis of the Red, Green, and Blue colors in order to create all of the various color nuances shown by your display.

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  • May 16, 2017

P, S, A, M, Auto: what shooting mode to choose and 3 exercises to better understand why

Most reflex cameras (as well as hybrids) have 4 shooting modes represented by the letters P, S, A and M. What are these modes? What are they used for? How do you use them? Here are some tips that will hopefully give you a better understanding of how to use your camera.

P, S, A, M, Auto

Questions about shooting modes are among the most frequently asked by our novice readers. This is particularly true of those users who have grown accustomed to using compact or bridge cameras are who, as a result, are left completely in the dark when it comes to the apparent complexity of reflex cameras. Here is the essential information you should keep in mind regarding shooting modes.

The Auto mode is your friend (it really is!)

If you find yourself completely at a loss when confronted with your brand new reflex camera’s different shooting modes, fall back on the automatic mode!

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  • May 12, 2017

AF-C, AF-S, AF-A, 9 points, 21 points,51 points, 3D tracking…: what autofocus mode and zone to choose

The choice of autofocus mode is one of the subjects which appears most often among the readers’ questions. What mode should I choose? Why? Why are my photos blurry?

Here is a description of the main Nikon autofocus modes: AF-S, AF-C and AF-A. Below you will also find a description of the main AF zone detection modes. The Nikon D5600’s AF module is one of the most complex to use.

autofocus modeHave you already mastered the shooting modes, but are still having difficulty with the autofocus modes? Without learning a minimum about the AF module, this is only normal; everything will become clear once you have understood how the AF module works.

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  • November 28, 2016

Tamron AFF017C700 SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD vs. Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens, which is better?

Presentation

We took advantage of the release of the Tamron SP 90 mm f/2,8 Macro Di VC USD update to confront it with its main rival in the Canon universe: the Canon EF 100 mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM.

Even if their focal lengths are not exactly the same, these two objectives both have the particularity to be designed for freehanded fieldwork and to integrate an optical stabilization.

Tamron SP 90 f/2,8 Di VC USD

We have recommended each of these two models in their respective tests, but between the two, what is the best choice? We will try to figure it out.

Features: Equality

These two objectives are very similar at the level of their technical characteristics. Both are designed for macro shooting and offer a reproduction report of 1 for 1 with a minimum distance of 30 cm for adjustment.

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  • September 21, 2016

iPhone 7 Plus Camera Review, the best camera Apple has ever made

The fact that every time a company presents a new phone its major innovation is in the camera is nothing new, and it says a lot, and I mean a lot, about the weight photography has in our lives. The last chapter of this beautiful love story between phones and photography has been written one of every year’s protagonist, the new model of Apple’s phone, the iPhone 7.

This time the cameras included in the 4.7 " models (iPhone 7) and 5,5″ models (iPhone 7 Plus) show significant differences. We discuss in this article some of the main technical features on both.

iPhone 7 – Contained improvement

Apple is still wisely avoiding the megapixels war. We’ve talked in several occasions of the amount of factors that influence the quality of a photograph regardless of the sensor’s resolution and it’s clear that Apple knows what it’s doing.

iPhone 7

The wide-angle 28mm-equivalent lens comprises a set of six lenses.

The camera’s improvement is not based on an increase in the photosites housed in the sensor. Apple understands it is on the limit in which actual technology allows quality imaging from a sensor with a diagonal of 1/3", really small when compared with one of our FULL FRAME.

http://img.thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/SENSOR-VS-300x202.jpg

The iPhone 7’s camera (4.7” screen model) carries a 1/3" sensor with 12MP resolution. Nothing new here.

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  • June 23, 2016

Superstitions about SLR Lenses

As we evolve in this little world of Reflex photography, the way in which we conceive objectives and lenses is constantly changing. Along our journey, many times, we adopt many wrong, erroneous and baseless ideas related with the objectives. Here, there are some of them. Please, make sure you don’t fall for any of these superstitions.

Does Size Matter?

At the beginning of our photographic life, when we finish landing in the "SLR" world, we believe that the best lens is the biggest and longest one, the one with greater range and greater zoom. We’ve all been through this typical moment in which we have seen a professional photographer walk around with a SLR with an 200mm or 600mm telephoto and we have stayed open-mouthed, thinking "How lucky, I wish I had one as big as that".

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  • June 14, 2016

Fotor vs Canva – Designated Photography Platform vs Tried and True Designer

 

http://img.thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Fotor-vs-Canva-1.png

With so many online graphic designers and imaging platforms, how do you find the one which is perfect for you? In this review, we are going to check out two very different online graphics designers and imaging platforms, determining their strengths and weaknesses relative to the unique requirements of the internet savvy designer and personal user.

Fotor vs Canva

To begin, let’s look at the heavyweight of this comparative review, Canva. Considered by many to be the ‘designer’s choice’, Canva’s polished HTML5 based interface and large number of templates bring a new level of control to the average user. The addition to these templates, Canva also provides a huge number of example templates, which can be directly used making ‘designing from scratch’ completely unnecessary. Keep in mind, while these pre-set designs look great, they are not necessarily free – something we will cover later in the review. Like the pre-set templates, Canva also provides loads of unique overlays and customizable clip art. While not always aesthetically pleasing, these additions cover a wide range of themes, providing loads of designing options and styles. In short, creating fantastic looking social media covers and other designs is easy with Canva, so what does its rival, Fotor, bring to the table?

Beginning its journey as a simple photo editing suite and HDR emulator, Fotor has grown significantly since its 2012 launch. Now with an extensive design feature, an international photographic competition platform and comprehensive utility functions, Fotor’s strengths lie in its dynamic nature. From a design perspective, Fotor lacks the ability to directly format and print your creations – this can be overlooked however, by the extensive editing and customization options built into the platform. While Canva has refined the ‘designing experience’ by highlighting certain features and limiting options, at times, Fotor can seem daunting in its sheer number of editing options and content. With all of the ‘bells and whistles’ you would a photo editor to have, Fotor also has a few interesting features under its belt, including a world leading HDR algorithm. Combining these elements brings a great deal of power to the fingertips of the average user, making Fotor a powerful contender to the ‘graphic designer’ throne.

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  • November 28, 2015

How to take group photos?

Perhaps it may seem trivial to do a tutorial on how to do group shots, but think about it, doing a good portrait is already hard enough and doing a group photo multiplies the difficulty by the number of people who appear in the photo.

You have to avoid common mistakes, such as caring for the expression, one person looking the other way or a figure overlapping the other, to more technical things, such as how to properly choose the focal length or how many people will make up the group.

What you must consider

You must have several factors in mind as that will increase your chances of success:

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  • August 28, 2015

10 Quick Reasons to get more from Live View

1. You can switch to Live View when using manual focus to achieve a higher degree of accuracy.

For that help yourself with the expander to center the focus on a specific area.

2. You can activate the grid to avoid crooked horizons and scenes. Live View is also ideal to place graduated filters in an exact manner.

3. You can test the AF direct face detection mode in Live View when you take pictures of children. It will follow them so you don’t have to refocus.

Canon

4. Live View is very useful with still life because you’ll get a 100% view to visualize it better.

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  • July 26, 2015

How to Take Powerful Motion Blur Pictures To Give The Illusion of Movement

Taking Powerful Motion Blur Pictures can be a difficult technique, but it’s definitely worth it.

The photographs made with Motion Blur to give the illusion of movement are extremely appealing to the human eye, by just juxtaposing two very different conditions in a scene: the frozen and the sense of movement. Before going over the tips, let’s review what this effect consists of.

Motion Blur Pictures

The Motion Blur Picture is simply the effect of background motion, with a protagonist almost perfectly exposed in a sharp and precise way. It would actually appear that there are two types of different shuttering speeds in one scene, or as if ultimately the picture was modified (just as shocking it can result!). However, nothing is further from reality. A Motion Blur Picture can be a bit difficult because it involves the movement of your own axis and the movement of one external (or more) agents that usually are the protagonists of the photo.

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