• August 28, 2015

10 Quick Reasons to get more from Live View

1. You can switch to Live View when using manual focus to achieve a higher degree of accuracy.

For that help yourself with the expander to center the focus on a specific area.

2. You can activate the grid to avoid crooked horizons and scenes. Live View is also ideal to place graduated filters in an exact manner.

3. You can test the AF direct face detection mode in Live View when you take pictures of children. It will follow them so you don’t have to refocus.

Canon

4. Live View is very useful with still life because you’ll get a 100% view to visualize it better.

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  • July 26, 2015

How to Take Powerful Motion Blur Pictures To Give The Illusion of Movement

Taking Powerful Motion Blur Pictures can be a difficult technique, but it’s definitely worth it.

The photographs made with Motion Blur to give the illusion of movement are extremely appealing to the human eye, by just juxtaposing two very different conditions in a scene: the frozen and the sense of movement. Before going over the tips, let’s review what this effect consists of.

Motion Blur Pictures

The Motion Blur Picture is simply the effect of background motion, with a protagonist almost perfectly exposed in a sharp and precise way. It would actually appear that there are two types of different shuttering speeds in one scene, or as if ultimately the picture was modified (just as shocking it can result!). However, nothing is further from reality. A Motion Blur Picture can be a bit difficult because it involves the movement of your own axis and the movement of one external (or more) agents that usually are the protagonists of the photo.

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  • July 24, 2015

How to Clean Your Camera Sensor? Here is an easy technique!

4 simple steps to clean the camera sensor

Photography is a fantastic exercise, which rarely gets you tired. However, you can see your creativity affected because of frustration or lack of knowledge of certain basic elements. This wear also results in wear to the camera sensor, which also suffers when it is widely used and it’s not taken care of. That’s when the most vexing problems arise: the appearance of spots in pictures. That’s when you know you should start cleaning the camera sensor.

Cleaning the camera sensor

The heart of the camera is the sensor, and it can quite scary to tamper with it, especially when you do it yourself. But cleaning the sensor is a necessary task, easier than you think. For this you will be a blower. What is a blower? This:

blower

These blowers are special devices to clean lenses or objectives and you can get them in related stores or just through internet, because they really are not very expensive (they cost from $4 to $ 9 on Amazon. You can get it by typing "Air blower for camera"). What are the steps to clean the camera sensor?

Blocking the mirror. Many techniques for cleaning the camera sensor begin by blocking the mirror. This option is usually within the specialized functions in the menu on your SLR (If you do don’t know how, take a look at the manual).

EOS 6D

Put your camera upside down. Since you use air to remove deposited dust, putting the camera upside down while you get to clean the camera sensor prevents the dust from dissipating within the camera or in the sensor again.

Use the blower. Put the blower to gently blow on the sensor. However, don’t touch the sensor or you can damage it.

Cleaning the camera sensor

Check if it worked. To verify that you could clean the sensor of the camera successfully, you must turn on the camera and set it as follows: trigger a shot against a white background (a wall works perfectly), with the smallest aperture possible (the higher the f / number, you know the drill) and the lens unfocused.

If the problem persists, buys or use a special natural bristle brush to clean the camera sensor. Be sure to clean it with a brush not used for anything else. And even if the brush does not work, be sure to repeat the above steps (including cleaning it with the brush) but this time, using a wet pad with a cleaner.

The truth is that when cleaning the camera sensor you must be very careful, but as you see it’s not that hard. Get to it!

  • July 22, 2015

How to Shoot In The Dark Without Using A Flash?

Darkness is a very tempting setting when talking about photography. Whether you are practicing night portrait or night scenes in general, the situation becomes complicated when you don’t understand very well the capacity of your camera. And it gets even worse when you don’t have a flash in hand, or because it is simply not allowed to use in the place where you are. So what is the best option to light without flash? You must go to the technical values ​​of your camera and just prepare your photographic eye, provided you are aware of your equipment limitation; let’s see what are the best tips to take photos without flash.

Illuminating a setting without flash? Yes you can!

Great aperture. We have talked before about the aperture and the way in which it affects the brightness in your photographs. The aperture capacity depends on your photographic lens and remember that the lower the f/, the more ability to open the diaphragm. Therefore, to set a suitable aperture we will need lenses of at least f / 2.8.

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  • May 1, 2015

Types and Characteristics of Camera Sensors

Terminology can be scary some times. So much technicality can repel us, right? But of the missions of this blog, if not the main one, is to spread photographic knowledge and to democratize photography among all of our readers.

A topic that is often put off due to its apparent complexity is the sensor one. That is false my friend. It is not at all a complex issue, in fact, it is quite the opposite. And even though it not bad to know some photography concepts, it turns out that the sensors is one key element in a camera.

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  • April 29, 2015

Megapixels and Printing Paper Sizes Table

If you are a lover of printed photography or paper photography, you will probably be interested in having a photographic camera with a lot of megapixels in it. For starters, the more megapixels, the better quality the picture will have.

But there are a few exceptions. Besides the number of megapixels, other factors that intervene can improve or worsen the quality of our picture (I will tell you more about this some other time).

Some of you will remember about an article I posted titled “4 big camera manufacturer deceptions”. In this article I’d tell you that sure megapixels were important when picking a camera, but you should not give it too much importance. While it is true that a decent amount of megapixels is needed in order to print a good quality photo, we should not look for high megapixel cameras. And it’s that people are usually swayed away by numbers, without even analyzing, without knowing what they want.

To settle this question once and for all, I have prepared a small table (lately I’m all about tables) by which you’ll be able to know how many megapixels you really need if you want to print your pictures in paper.

This graphic is based in a 300dpi quality picture. If you don’t know what this number is, worry not, as it is just a photo quality indicator. Normally, a 200dpi picture should have a decent quality, but here I present to you a table based in a 300dpi quality, or in other words, EXCELENT quality.

Megapixel and Print sizes Table:

Megapixels
Print Size (cm))
Print Size (inches)
2 MP 13.2 x 10.2 cm 5.2″ x 4″
3 MP 17.3 x 13 cm 6.82″ x 5.12″
4 MP 20.9 x 13.8 cm 8.21″ x 5.44″
6 MP 25.4 x 16.9 cm 10.02″ x 6.67″
8 MP 27.6 x 20.7 cm 10.88″ x 8.16″
10 MP 32.8 x 21.9 cm 12.91″ x 8.64″
12 MP 36.3 x 23.7 cm 14.30″ x 9.34″
16 MP 41.7 x 27.6 cm 16.40″ x 10.88″
20 MP 46.5 x 31 cm 18.3″ x 12.2″
24 MP 50.9 x 34 cm 20.02″ x 13.4″
30 MP 56.9 x 37.8 cm 22.40″ x 14.9″
36 MP 62 x 41.4 cm 24.40″ x 16.3″
44 MP 68.6 x 45.7 cm 27″ x 18″

So now you see friends that a 10 megapixel camera should be able to capture pictures that we can print in an A4 folio, ensuring the maximum quality.

Do you understand now why I always insist that it’s ok to care about the megapixels, but you should not obsess with it either?

No more excuses. It doesn’t matter which camera you have, as long as it has 10 megapixels, 8 or 6. It’s not all about megapixels for a good photograph. You will get the good photograph.

  • April 28, 2015

Understand the SLR camera’s specifications

I publish SLR camera comparisons regularly, but it is possible that every time I post one I might be feeling intimidated by the terminology and the specifications of the photographic jargon. What does it mean if a camera has or doesn’t have a focus motor? And does the screen resolution affect the quality of the pictures? And what’s that about pictures per second?

Nikon D7200

In today’s article I will be clearing all those doubts. Bookmark it for a future reference because it sure will be helpful for you more than once.

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  • January 14, 2015

What are the Optical Low Pass Filter (AA filters) and how do they affect your photographs?

If you are up to date with the photographing world, the release of the several high end cameras that lack the AA filter or Optical lower pass filter might have caught your eye. I am taking about cameras such as the Nikon D800E or the Pentax K-5 IIs, which are special versions of the D800 and the K-5 II respectively, but also cameras like the Nikon D7100, and the lastest Nikon D5500, which were released without the filter.

Optical Low Pass Filter

You are probably wondering why these camera versions are more expensive even though they lack of something the normal version cameras have. In this post I will try to explain what this filter consists of, what is it that it normally does and what are its advantages and disadvantages of not having it in our cameras.

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  • December 20, 2014

Should white balance setups be totally ignored in the taking of RAW photographs?

I was asked by some friends that whether the white balance setups can be totally neglected when taking RAW photos. I believe this may also be one of the puzzles by many others during their process of gradual elevation.

Undauntedly, white balance is of great importance to a good photo, because white balance determines wither the colors are correct, and it also decided the style of a photo’s tone. Nevertheless, I hold that white balance is a lower stream operation of RAW — RAW upper stream and RAW lower stream are the extremely important concepts on digital photography, which is especially true of those taking photos in the format of RAW; simply put, if what you take is JPEG or TIFF, then, in the late processing, it would be impossible to alter the white balance. You can conduct modifications on the white balance through software; however, fundamentally, this is a result obtained by altering the hue, instead of truly changing the photo’s white balance. This is because white balance is the information embedded inside JPEG. The 5200K at the time of your photo-taking will remain 5200K, with no way of changing it during the late stage.

However, if you take a RAW, the circumstance will be different. Almost all the RAW processing software allows you to alter the RAW photo’s white balance. During photo-taking, the color temperature was 5200K, and you can freely elevate it to 6500K during the late stage or reduce it to 3200K. Lightroom’s white balance commands are different on the displays of JPEG and RAW. The former displays a value with 0 as the center, while the latter displays the photo’s actual color temperature.

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  • December 11, 2014

White Balance: A basic tip but also unknown to many

White balance is a very useful setting that shows the correct color reproduction, but we commonly use the white balance set in automatic whatever the situation, which many times it gives us an unexpected result or even unpleasant for some people.

The white balance must adapt itself to the situation that we want to handle. Here are 2 photographs; in fact they are the same, only that in one of them we have a different white balance to the other one.

Basically we are helping the camera understand what type of lighting is being received in the lens and then in the sensor to capture the image, we will decide if we let the camera detect the lighting (Automatic) or if we have artificial lighting such as FLASH or Daylight, Cloudy, Shade, Tungsten, Fluorescent, and Custom.

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