• March 16, 2017

Microsoft “turns its back” again on Windows 10 Mobile

The results Microsoft is obtaining with the mobile version of Windows 10 are much worse than what the firm expected in the beginning, even more so if you consider the market penetration this system currently has, if you compare it with other proposals like iOS or Android, it is practically nonexistent.

In fact it’s getting to a point in which, given some of the latest movements from the people at Redmond, it would seem that they are finally starting to give up on their Windows 10 Mobile development. Over the last few months we have seen how Microsoft itself is updating and improving, in many ways, its applications on other mobile platforms such as Android and iOS, rather than Windows 10 Mobile itself.

Windows 10 Mobile

Well, the last movement we saw from Microsoft, does nothing but confirm this assumption, this was done in the last monthly update that was just made available to the general public. In this you can see that, once again, the Redmond firm has ignored the security errors detected in the mobile version of Windows 10, which shows that Windows phones are not exactly one of the main priorities of the company these days.

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  • March 16, 2017

Fujifilm X-T20 vs. XT2, what’s the difference?

First announced in January 2017, and available since March, the Fuji X-T20 is Fujifilm’s latest APS-C hybrid. It completes the X line of products which also includes the X-T2 and the X-Pro2 and it replaces the Fuji X-T10 which was released in June 2015.

This new release serves as a good opportunity for us to revisit the strategy behind Fujifilm’s line of products. What is the difference between the X-T20 and the X-T2 – from which it has borrowed many of its technical characteristics?

The X-T20, a mini X-T2?

Without yet having been able to test the X-T20, we can already say that its case makes it seem like a small version of its larger brother – the X-T2, just as the X-T10 was to the X-T1. It reuses the same sensor: the APS-C X-Trans III with a 24,3 Mpx resolution – with no low-pass filter, accompanied by the latest image processor – the X Pro. Moreover, this is the processor used in the X-Pro2 and the new X100F.

X-T20

Fuji has harmonized its whole X product line by using the same image processor in all of its models: the X100F, the Xpro2, the X-T20 and the X-T2. By doing so, a photographer, going from one model to another, will always end up with the same image. This might seem like an insignificant detail, but for a photographer who uses several devices, knowing that the image will always be the same is a real advantage.

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  • March 15, 2017

Canon G7X vs. G7X Mark II vs. Sony RX100 III vs. RX100 IV vs. RX100 V vs. Panasonic LX15: The Professional Compact Cameras Comparison

Should I get the Canon G7X Mark I or Mark II, or a Sony RX100 III? Or maybe even a camera that supports 4k video shooting? If so, the Panasonic Lumix LX15 or Sony’s RX100 IV?

Are you asking yourself these questions? Me too. That’s why I have tested all of them.

I personally owned a Sony CyberShot DSC-RX100 III and loved it. The only drawback being that I managed to break it. I replaced it with a Panasonic Lumix LX15.

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  • February 28, 2017

Sony RX100 IV vs. RX100 V: what’s the difference?

So, Sony just announced their 5th generation of the RX100 series of cameras as sort of a side note.

Naturally, such an announcement really excites me and of course, the RX100 V is a great camera … I am still somewhat disappointed however.

Sony RX100 V

But let’s start from beginning.

The most important technical data of the RX100 IV & V

RX100 V RX100 IV
Dimensions (WxHxD) 101.6 x 58.1 x 41.0 mm
Weight incl. Battery and memory card 299g 298g
Sensor Exmor RS 1″ with Phasen-AF Exmor RS 1″
Focal length (KB) 24-70mm
Max.cover f/1.8
Min. cover f/11
Exposure time 1/32000s – 30s
LCD swivel 180/°45°
Display Size 3″ (4:3)
Display Resolution (pixels) 1.228.800
Optical viewfinder Yes
Internal image stabilizer Yes
Image processor BIONZ X
ISO sensitivity 80 – 12.8000
Accessory shoe No
Microphone input No
Headphone output No
Video bit rate 4k 100MBps (XAVC S)
ND filter Yes
Wi-Fi & NFC Yes
Recording 24 frames / second 16 frames / second
GPS nein
Autofocus 315-point phase detection Contrast detection
Battery life (CIPA) 220 280
More information on Amazon More information on Amazon More information on Amazon

Sony RX100 V vs. RX100 IV – How is the New One Better?

Autofocus

The biggest improvement inside the RX100 V is the new sensor that now offers phase-detection autofocus. It sports 315 phase-detection AF-points that cover around 65% of the image.

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  • February 28, 2017

Canon EOS Rebel T7i vs EOS 77D vs EOS 80D, what’s the difference?

When the entry-level EOS Rebel was rolled out into the market by Canon some years back, launched simultaneously with it was the Rebel T61. Basically, both have a striking resemblance and more or less showcase the same set of features. In terms of body-mounted controls, the T6s definitely had more to offer, as well as a small LCD display which has been designed to appeal to users with more experience, who require having more control. 

Fast track to just two years and canon is at it again, with the roll out of the EOS Rebel T7i, as well as the 77D which will comfortably rank among the company’s best entry-level camera. (More information about T7I and 77D, please read this article)

To make things a bit clear and ensure that Canon’s model numbering is well understood, the EOS T6i will be replaced by the EOS T7i, whereas in canon’s enthusiast EOS DSLR range, the successor of the T6s is the EOS 77D and ranks just a little below EOS 80D.

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  • February 23, 2017

Canon T7i vs 77D vs T6i vs T6s, what’s the difference?

The latest product in the long chain of entry level Canon DSLRs are the Canon EOS Rebel T7i and EOS 77d. The origin of the Canon DSLRs can be traced back to the original EOS Digital Rebel that was introduced sometime in 2003.

From then till date, all the updates and iterations following it have all been generally accepted as a market choice by both experienced and new users. The latest EOS Rebel T6i/T6s from Canon has proven to be a market best choice entry-level DSLRs. It comes with features that make it suitable for new users, while its polished handling makes its usability easy.

The T7i and the 77D can be considered as two different models of the same product. While the T7i follows the model style of the classic Canon XX0D series in manipulation, the 77D takes 80D as an example, as it is not only equipped with a top LCD display but also has an installed Quick Canon Control dial, forming the classic double-command dial control style of Canon.

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  • February 21, 2017

Canon EOS 77D, information and hands-on of the new advanced DSLR

After a few days of rumors, Canon has made official the launch of three new models of digital cameras including a mirrorless, the EOS M6, and two SLR, the EOS 77D and T7i, the first of which opens a new tier in the firm’s catalog of DSLR models. We’ll tell you all the details about the camera and our impressions based on a short hands-on made with a pre-production model.

Canon EOS 77D

The Canon EOS 77D arrives to be positioned immediately below the EOS 80D, model with which it shares many features (which are also common to the other two cameras presented today), mainly the 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology, the next-generation DIGIC 7 processor, the rear touch screen and the low power Bluetooth connection in order to maintain a constant connection between the camera and a smartphone.

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  • February 20, 2017

Canon EOS Rebel T7i, information and hands-on of the new mid-low-range DSLR

Together with the new EOS M6 and EOS 77D, Canon has also introduced the renewal of its mid-low range of digital SLR cameras that is embodied in the new EOS T7i (EOS 800D). As we have done with the other models, we offer you all the details about it as well as some first impressions obtained in the hands-on we had with a pre-production model.

As we’ve said before, unlike the other two models presented today, the Canon EOS T7i is a model that does arrive to replace a camera, or rather two, which already have some time on the market, the EOS T6i and T6s , within a product range consolidated for years. In fact, the new EOS T7i is the new generation of the legendary EOS 300D that in 2003 broke molds by presenting itself as the first "Affordable DSLR".

Canon EOS Rebel T7i

After some years, this line is no longer the entry point of the DSLR, but it is located in an intermediate segment, more specifically it is the highest within the entry range and it is an "excellent camera to start your first journey in the DSLR world," according to Canon. In this sense, the model is aimed at a user who seeks image quality but who has no aspirations to go beyond that and doesn’t plan on learning advanced photography.

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  • February 16, 2017

Best Camera phone 2017: Camera Buyer’s Guide: the Best Camera-Phones, Applications and Accessories

While certain segments of the camera market are struggling to keep their heads above water (single lens reflex, hybrids) and others have almost ceased to exist (compacts), there is one segment which has continued to grow to the point of reaching omnipresence: smartphones. If having a smartphone was considered being at the forefront of technology just a few years ago, these products have since been popularized to the point where even entry-level models already offer all the indispensable features.

Best Camera phone

This mass popularization has had a striking effect on the world of photography: the device which you always have on you, the one you take out of your pocket in all circumstances, is no longer a compact camera, but rather your telephone. Its always there, turned on, ready and connected. Nevertheless, all smartphones are not created equal where photographic capability is concerned, and the cheapest models are to be avoided if you are looking for a high-quality camera.

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last comments ...
Andrew
Andrew

Lumia 1020 is the best of them all
Subash
Subash

Yeah, I am also finding difficult to buy Lumia 1020
achilleslstand
achilleslstand

Pure B.S. - The Lumia 1020 Blows 'em all away!
Drew
Drew

I'd really like to see how the Nokia 808 compares. Someone had to say it,and new ones are…
Farhad Ahmad
Farhad Ahmad

I would like to talk about the latest phone developed by iDROID USA, the iDROID Tango 2 has a great…

  • February 12, 2017

Phone cameras will have RAM and will record in 4K at 60 fps and 1080 at 240 fps.

Phone cameras have features increasingly amazing, and in some cases they surpass professional cameras. For example, you could spend more than a thousand dollars in a camera that records in 1080p at 120 fps, while a modern high range mobile phone has it built-in. obviously, the size of the sensor and the image quality differ from one another, but it still is amazing that today’s mobile phones are able to record at such frame rate with such high resolution.

Cameras able to record in 4K at 60fps and 1080 at 240 fps thank to Sony’s new sensor.

On top of that modern mobile phones can record in 1080 at 120fps, or 4K at 30 fps, the new sensors designed by Sony entail that in some time no so long from now we will see the first mobile phones able to record in 4K at 60fps, 1080p at 240fps, slow-motion with an amazing quality and able to play at that frame rate in compatible monitors (since there are already some with a spec up to 240 Hertz), with a maximum theoretical frame rate of 1.000fps in 1080. Regarding photographs, the sensor will count with 21.2 Megapixels.

Phone cameras

Sony has designed this new phone CMOS sensor that consist in three layers, including in one of them something that has not been previously seen in a camera sensor: a RAM memory chip. Specifically, it will include a 125 MB chip that can read 19.3 million pixels in 1/120 seconds, which is four times faster than current chips.

Phone cameras

Current phone sensors have a hard time taking pictures at high speed, these, having slight distortion due to the capture rate and the way that sensors work, even in speeds greater than 1/300 seconds. The new Sony sensor is four times faster than current ones, which helps to highly mend the problem. The pixel size of the sensor is 1.22μm, which improves the lighting as well in low light spaces, while reducing noise.

Higher speed thanks to the RAM and its new construction.

Digital sensor shutters on mobile phones don’t count with a mechanical shutter as it happens in Digital single-lens reflex cameras, for which exposure time is control digitally. That’s why distortion is created when taking pictures of moving objects as car or a train. The inclusion of the RAM chip in the sensor allows higher processing speed, while reducing software loading time.

Sony has not announce when the new sensor with RAM will be available, but it should be for year’s end or earlier next year, and it probably will be release in Xperia phones, coming later for other brands.

Read More:
Best Camera phone 2017
Sony A6300 vs. A6500