• July 10, 2017

Nikon D750 vs D810 vs D610 vs D4s vs DF, What’s the difference?

Full Frame: Nikon’s bold gamble

When Nikon announced D750, two things happened. First, some slowdown was noticed amongst buyers of D810, of which a quite significant number would have waited a little more to invest in a D750 and by the way saved 1000 dollars in price difference. I can understand them, it makes sense even if, a closer examination shows that Nikon D810 has some specificities that D750 does not have; we will get back to this. Then, and strangely enough, some have thought that the launch of D750 marked the end of Nikon D610. And that frankly, I do not buy for a second, I rather believe the opposite. I think that with the launch of D750, Nikon has firmly established its range of digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex), taking up the challenge of full frame. Personally, this range does holds up, up to four times better. Except for Nikon D750, I have used all cases of the Nikon full frame range during long work sessions. Just yesterday, I was working on pictures taken with Nikon D610 and I was captivated by the image quality, dynamism and sharpness. Last July, during an interview, I was asked what would be my advice to a young professional photographer wishing to start using the Nikon range and I answered without a moment’s pause, Nikon D610. My answer might be different today with the announcement of Nikon D750, but nonetheless, each Nikon case belonging to the full frame frame range has its own assets. It is impossible to contrast one with another and difficult to compare them. Each reflex has its target and its customers it will match. Following is a brief overview of the Nikon 24*26 range, but first a basic question. Why choose a Full Frame?

https://thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/nikon-dslr.jpg

Why a full frame format DSLR?

Photographers from Argentina (mentioning no names) would look at you in a funny manner if you were to ask them that question. This is because, in olden days, you see, the film was not cut into pieces, a SLR (single lens reflex) camera was 24*36 and that was it. When the digital showed up, there were contingencies and technical requirements which made it more economical and less costly to manufacture sensors that are not full format. In the beginning, Nikon has delivered DX sensors with a conversion factor of 1.5. Canon, on its side, has made APS-C sensors on its amateurs range (conversion factor of 1.6) and even APS-H (conversion factor of 1.3) on some SLR of the Pro range (e.g. EOS 1D Mark IV). Some have seen in the non full frame sensor a major advantage. Indeed, an optical of 200mm behaved like a focal of 320mm, all this with the help of APS-C sensor alone. But what was interesting upstream proved more difficult in the other direction. It was not wise enough for a 16mm to become a 26mm. Full format also affects other parameters such as the depth of field, the quality of the image and its dynamics and leads to a more demanding range of optics.

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