• August 24, 2017

Best Camera phone 2018: Camera Buyer’s Guide: the Best Camera-Phones, Applications and Accessories

While certain segments of the camera market are struggling to keep their heads above water (single lens reflex, hybrids) and others have almost ceased to exist (compacts), there is one segment which has continued to grow to the point of reaching omnipresence: smartphones. If having a smartphone was considered being at the forefront of technology just a few years ago, these products have since been popularized to the point where even entry-level models already offer all the indispensable features.

Best Camera phone

This mass popularization has had a striking effect on the world of photography: the device which you always have on you, the one you take out of your pocket in all circumstances, is no longer a compact camera, but rather your telephone. Its always there, turned on, ready and connected. Nevertheless, all smartphones are not created equal where photographic capability is concerned, and the cheapest models are to be avoided if you are looking for a high-quality camera.

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last comments ...
Andrew
Andrew

Lumia 1020 is the best of them all
Subash
Subash

Yeah, I am also finding difficult to buy Lumia 1020
achilleslstand
achilleslstand

Pure B.S. - The Lumia 1020 Blows 'em all away!
Drew
Drew

I'd really like to see how the Nokia 808 compares. Someone had to say it,and new ones are…
Farhad Ahmad
Farhad Ahmad

I would like to talk about the latest phone developed by iDROID USA, the iDROID Tango 2 has a great…

  • August 18, 2017

Best / Fastest Micro SD cards for Gopro and cameras Buying Guide

A Quick Guide to buying a suitable memory card for your camera.

Card Types:

The majority of entry-level and intermediate range SLR cameras use an SD (Secure Digital) type card. Professional SLRs usually use the CF (Compact Flash) format. To look at they are easily distinguishable because the SDs are smaller, rectangular and have one of the corners cut at an angle, while the CF are larger and almost square.

Micro SD cards

Inside, the SD cards have evolved with regards to capacity and speed of recording. Regarding capacity:

  • SD: It is the oldest, original format with capacity up to 2 GB. These days they are rarely used.
  • SDHC: Capacity up to 32GB
  • SDXC. Capacity over 32GB (up to 2TB)

While the capacity is important, the speed of recording is even more important. SD cards are organised into classes, each class ensures a certain minimum recording speed (sequential write speed, more on this later).

Micro SD cards

There are currently three different classifying systems: Speed Class (C2 to C10), UH Speed Class (U1 and U3) and the new classes aimed at video Video Speed Class (V6 to V90). They are independent of each other, but for practical purposes, what matters is to know what can work for our camera and what is the most appropriate.

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  • August 2, 2017

35mm vs. 50mm vs. 85mm comparison: What’s the difference and What fixed focal length lens should you choose?

When we speak about fixed focal length lenses, it is usually to extol their merits. We even dedicated a large portion of our lens buyer’s guide to fixed focal length lenses. However, the main question most people still have, is which fixed focal length lens they should choose: 35 mm, 50 mm or 85 mm?

35 mm, 50 mm or 85 mm

That is why this “Practical Wednesday” will be dedicated to helping you better understand the differences between these lenses.

APS-C or 24×36?

The fist question you need to answer is whether your camera’s sensor is APS-C format (or even smaller on certain hybrid cameras) or full frame format (full format, 24×36).

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  • July 27, 2017

Best Mirrorless Camera of 2017 for Beginners and Professionals and their Lenses

In the past few years, mirrorless have unquestionably been the cameras which have evolved the most: nowadays they offer many advantages, such as small size, constantly improving image quality as well as a continuously expanding range of available lenses. In this guide, we have selected the best currently available mirrorless cameras as well as their respective lenses for beginners and professionals.

Why buy a mirrorless camera?

A mirrorless camera (hybrid cameras) is basically a mirrorless compact camera with a large sensor (1 inch, 4/3, APS-C or Full Frame) and with interchangeable lenses.

In fact, these cameras are a cross between compact and DSLR cameras – and therein lies their appeal. They are more compact than reflex models – since they are mirrorless. They are also generally larger than compact cameras which makes them easier to hold and above all allows them to offer an image quality equivalent to that of DSLR cameras, due to their large sensors.

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  • July 25, 2017

Canon Rebel T5i vs T6i vs T6s, what’s the difference?

The T6s is an upgraded product of the T5i. Canon has released a total of two replacement products for the T5i, which are the more advanced T6s and more entry level T6i. Unlike the T5i, which almost didn’t upgrade the T4i at all, Canon has taken a lot of care in the upgrade of the T6s. The T6s is the best entry-level SLR camera of the Canon line, if not the best of the SLR camera market, because it has promoted the manipulation of the entry-level SLR camera to a new level.

Canon 750D and 760D

The T6i and the T6s can be considered as two different models of the same product. While the T6i follows the model style of the classic Canon XX0D series in manipulation, the T6s takes the 70D as an example, as it is not only equipped with a top LCD display but also has an installed Quick Canon Control dial, forming the classic double-command dial control style of Canon.

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last comments ...
Tamapo Major
Tamapo Major

rebel t5i is canon700d what is rebel t6i called in Europe
admin
admin

750D.
frank
frank

note that all 9 auto focus points are cross type, not just the center
Ashenafi Tsegaye
Ashenafi Tsegaye

T6s is greater than 5D canon
Marylyn
Marylyn

Where can I get fre online tutorials

  • July 18, 2017

Nikon D7500 Review: the difference between Nikon D7500 vs. D5600 vs. D500

It has only just been released and it has already been tested! I have just spend over a week testing the new professional reflex camera from the Nikon DX product line: the Nikon D7500.

More than 2000 photos later, here is all the information you will need to determine whether or not this reflex camera – which is situated between the D5600 and the D500 – is right for you!

Test of the Nikon D7500: presentation

The Nikon D7500 is an APS-C reflex camera with an impressive technical datasheet which completes the Nikon DX product lineup:

  • 20 megapixel sensor without a low-pass filter from the Nikon D500,
  • Expeed 5 processor,
  • 8 images/second burst mode,
  • integrated flash,
  • 4K video in mp4 format.

You can consult the list of differences between the D500 and the D7500 here.

The Nikon D7500 is the answer for photographers who are in search of a DX camera with professional ergonomics and with the best currently available Nikon DX sensor within a compact and light-weight format. In other words, performance characteristics very similar to those of the D500 – if you don’t mind living without certain technical and ergonomic features – all for a lower price of around 700 euros (according to a comparison of publicly available prices).

Nikon D7500

As I do for every camera, I conducted this test of the Nikon D7500 under different shooting conditions in order to evaluate its general performance. In the text that follows, I will give you my opinion of this camera after having used it, in comparison to other models which I have recently tested – the D500 in particular.

Test of the Nikon D7500: ranking

With the introduction of the Nikon D7500, Nikon was able to reorganize its professional DX product line. Instead of offering only one professional model, as was previously the case with the D7000, D7100 and D7200, it is now possible to choose between two models:

  • the Nikon D500,
  • and the Nikon D7500.

Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500

Both of these models use the same sensor, meaning that the image quality of both is the same. It is in terms of performance and ergonomics that these two cameras differ:

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  • July 11, 2017

Different types of camera lenses and their uses: The indispensable lenses you should buying

This is our third buyer’s guide dedicated to lenses. If you were forced to choose between a good camera and a good lens what would be your choice? Many of us would normally choose the camera since it is full of gadgets and innovations. But, would that really be the best choice?

The lens: your camera’s most crucial component

The lens is one of your camera’s most crucial components, if not THE most crucial (for both reflex and hybrid cameras): the lens is what makes it possible to capture light. Put a poor-quality lens on a good-quality camera and you will quickly discover that the camera will not be able to achieve its full potential. The opposite is also true to a lesser extent, and there is really no point in putting a very high-end lens on an entry-level camera.

Lens

The idea here is to find the right balance, without forgetting that a lens is an investment that will undoubtedly outlive your current camera – if you intend to remain with the same manufacturer when you buy your next camera. It is probable that you will change cameras in 3, 6 or 8 years, but the same can not be said about your lenses, especially if you have chosen good-quality ones. Lenses do not really wear out, they do not really get damaged (depending on how you use them) and do not really diminish in quality relative to the new lenses appearing on the market.

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  • July 10, 2017

Nikon D750 vs D810 vs D610 vs D4s vs DF, What’s the difference?

Full Frame: Nikon’s bold gamble

When Nikon announced D750, two things happened. First, some slowdown was noticed amongst buyers of D810, of which a quite significant number would have waited a little more to invest in a D750 and by the way saved 1000 dollars in price difference. I can understand them, it makes sense even if, a closer examination shows that Nikon D810 has some specificities that D750 does not have; we will get back to this. Then, and strangely enough, some have thought that the launch of D750 marked the end of Nikon D610. And that frankly, I do not buy for a second, I rather believe the opposite. I think that with the launch of D750, Nikon has firmly established its range of digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex), taking up the challenge of full frame. Personally, this range does holds up, up to four times better. Except for Nikon D750, I have used all cases of the Nikon full frame range during long work sessions. Just yesterday, I was working on pictures taken with Nikon D610 and I was captivated by the image quality, dynamism and sharpness. Last July, during an interview, I was asked what would be my advice to a young professional photographer wishing to start using the Nikon range and I answered without a moment’s pause, Nikon D610. My answer might be different today with the announcement of Nikon D750, but nonetheless, each Nikon case belonging to the full frame frame range has its own assets. It is impossible to contrast one with another and difficult to compare them. Each reflex has its target and its customers it will match. Following is a brief overview of the Nikon 24*26 range, but first a basic question. Why choose a Full Frame?

https://thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/nikon-dslr.jpg

Why a full frame format DSLR?

Photographers from Argentina (mentioning no names) would look at you in a funny manner if you were to ask them that question. This is because, in olden days, you see, the film was not cut into pieces, a SLR (single lens reflex) camera was 24*36 and that was it. When the digital showed up, there were contingencies and technical requirements which made it more economical and less costly to manufacture sensors that are not full format. In the beginning, Nikon has delivered DX sensors with a conversion factor of 1.5. Canon, on its side, has made APS-C sensors on its amateurs range (conversion factor of 1.6) and even APS-H (conversion factor of 1.3) on some SLR of the Pro range (e.g. EOS 1D Mark IV). Some have seen in the non full frame sensor a major advantage. Indeed, an optical of 200mm behaved like a focal of 320mm, all this with the help of APS-C sensor alone. But what was interesting upstream proved more difficult in the other direction. It was not wise enough for a 16mm to become a 26mm. Full format also affects other parameters such as the depth of field, the quality of the image and its dynamics and leads to a more demanding range of optics.

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last comments
Jozef
Jozef

As a Nikon D3s shooter I was about to choose D810 for a second camera for weddings. Well since the…
Spanky
Spanky

I think we need to seperate our love and passion for these truly more capable devices, from our all to…

  • July 8, 2017

Nikon D7500 vs. Nikon D500: what’s the difference?

With the announcement of the D7500 and Nikon’s intentions of retaining the D7200 in their product catalog, choosing a professional APS-C DX reflex camera has become more difficult. So, Nikon D7500 or Nikon D500, which one should you choose? Listed here are the main differences between these two devices as well as a comparison chart to help you make up your mind.

Nikon D7500 or Nikon D500: Which Nikon DX should you choose?

By announcing the Nikon D7500, Nikon was satisfying the demands of users interested in a professional device with an ergonomic design (see the test of the Nikon D500) as well as those users interested in a lighter, more compact device that is as capable as any other.

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  • July 6, 2017

Best Full Frame DSLR Camera 2017 Buying Guide (Cheapest and professional Canon, Nikon, Sony DSLR)

After having discussed the best models of APS-C DSLR cameras, here is our buyer’s guide for digital full frame models.

Full frame cameras have a 24×36 mm format sensor which provides superior image quality; they are also built to provide good long-term performance. This past year, no revolutionary technology has been released as far as full frame cameras are concerned, except for the fact that sensors without low-pass filters have become a standard feature. There is however a race going on, a race for increased performance and Nikon is currently offering no fewer than five full frame DSLR cameras! Competition is fierce and it is leading to the development of ever more powerful cameras.

Why buy a full frame DSLR camera?

Before presenting the different available models, let’s take another look at the characteristics that make full frame DSLR cameras so interesting.

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