• September 27, 2017

Photo lab – The Nikon D850 vs.the D810 vs. Sony A7R II vs. Canon EOS 5DsR, which is better?

It’s brand new, it’s beautiful, and above all, it has arrived at our photo lab: the Nikon D850. And what a joy it is! It’s enough to make us happy to have returned from holidays. And we are full of energy and motivation as well as curiosity: so, how does its 45.7 megapixel BSI CMOS 45,7 sensor stack up against the current kings of high definition?

It was not difficult to make a selection of cameras able to compete with the Nikon D850 as its only serious competitors are: its predecessor – the D810, the Sony Alpha 7R II and the Canon EOS 5Ds R. In order to avoid favoritism, for the purposes of this test, all of these cameras will be mounted with a Sigma Art 35 mm f/1.4 DG HSM lens (one with a Nikon F mount and one with a Canon EF mount). The two questions we will be asking are: what can Imatest tell us about the resolving power of the Nikon D850? And, how does the camera behave at high ISO sensitivity values?

Imatest: a well-designed 45.7 megapixel BSI CMOS sensor

The Imatest software, in association with SFRplus chart, is able to measure the resolving power of a given lens relative to a given sensor. In other words, while using the same lens, this test will determine a camera’s ability to distinguish very fine details in three distinct zones: the center, periphery, and edges of the frame. The graphs it produces are very easy to read: the higher the curves, the better (as far as resolving power is concerned), and the closer the three curves are to each other, the better (in terms of the lens’s homogeneity at a given aperture opening). You can click on the images below to enlarge them.

Nikon D850 vs.the D810

Nikon D850 vs.the D810

Nikon D850 vs.the D810

Nikon D850 vs.the D810

Compared to the D810, the D850 is more precise at wider aperture, despite being equivalent at f/8. However, the D850’s increased definition makes it more susceptible to diffraction effects. If you commonly operate at f/11 and beyond, the D810 would probably be better suited to your needs.

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  • August 29, 2017

Nikon D850: overview and technical characteristics

For its 100th anniversary, Nikon has announced the release of the Nikon D850.

This pixel rich reflex camera will replace the Nikon D810 to satisfy the needs of photographers who are looking for a camera with the best possible performance characteristics which is also capable of producing very high definition photos and videos.

Nikon D850

Nikon D850: overview and technical characteristics

Just as for the Nikon D5, the announcement of the D850’s release was done in two stages: a pre-announcement in July during which time no technical specifications were given, and an announcement in August accompanied by the details of the camera’s technical data sheet.

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  • July 18, 2017

Nikon D7500 Review: the difference between Nikon D7500 vs. D5600 vs. D500

It has only just been released and it has already been tested! I have just spend over a week testing the new professional reflex camera from the Nikon DX product line: the Nikon D7500.

More than 2000 photos later, here is all the information you will need to determine whether or not this reflex camera – which is situated between the D5600 and the D500 – is right for you!

Test of the Nikon D7500: presentation

The Nikon D7500 is an APS-C reflex camera with an impressive technical datasheet which completes the Nikon DX product lineup:

  • 20 megapixel sensor without a low-pass filter from the Nikon D500,
  • Expeed 5 processor,
  • 8 images/second burst mode,
  • integrated flash,
  • 4K video in mp4 format.

You can consult the list of differences between the D500 and the D7500 here.

The Nikon D7500 is the answer for photographers who are in search of a DX camera with professional ergonomics and with the best currently available Nikon DX sensor within a compact and light-weight format. In other words, performance characteristics very similar to those of the D500 – if you don’t mind living without certain technical and ergonomic features – all for a lower price of around 700 euros (according to a comparison of publicly available prices).

Nikon D7500

As I do for every camera, I conducted this test of the Nikon D7500 under different shooting conditions in order to evaluate its general performance. In the text that follows, I will give you my opinion of this camera after having used it, in comparison to other models which I have recently tested – the D500 in particular.

Test of the Nikon D7500: ranking

With the introduction of the Nikon D7500, Nikon was able to reorganize its professional DX product line. Instead of offering only one professional model, as was previously the case with the D7000, D7100 and D7200, it is now possible to choose between two models:

  • the Nikon D500,
  • and the Nikon D7500.

Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500

Both of these models use the same sensor, meaning that the image quality of both is the same. It is in terms of performance and ergonomics that these two cameras differ:

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  • July 10, 2017

Nikon D750 vs D810 vs D610 vs D4s vs DF, What’s the difference?

Full Frame: Nikon’s bold gamble

When Nikon announced D750, two things happened. First, some slowdown was noticed amongst buyers of D810, of which a quite significant number would have waited a little more to invest in a D750 and by the way saved 1000 dollars in price difference. I can understand them, it makes sense even if, a closer examination shows that Nikon D810 has some specificities that D750 does not have; we will get back to this. Then, and strangely enough, some have thought that the launch of D750 marked the end of Nikon D610. And that frankly, I do not buy for a second, I rather believe the opposite. I think that with the launch of D750, Nikon has firmly established its range of digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex), taking up the challenge of full frame. Personally, this range does holds up, up to four times better. Except for Nikon D750, I have used all cases of the Nikon full frame range during long work sessions. Just yesterday, I was working on pictures taken with Nikon D610 and I was captivated by the image quality, dynamism and sharpness. Last July, during an interview, I was asked what would be my advice to a young professional photographer wishing to start using the Nikon range and I answered without a moment’s pause, Nikon D610. My answer might be different today with the announcement of Nikon D750, but nonetheless, each Nikon case belonging to the full frame frame range has its own assets. It is impossible to contrast one with another and difficult to compare them. Each reflex has its target and its customers it will match. Following is a brief overview of the Nikon 24*26 range, but first a basic question. Why choose a Full Frame?

https://thedigitalcamera.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/nikon-dslr.jpg

Why a full frame format DSLR?

Photographers from Argentina (mentioning no names) would look at you in a funny manner if you were to ask them that question. This is because, in olden days, you see, the film was not cut into pieces, a SLR (single lens reflex) camera was 24*36 and that was it. When the digital showed up, there were contingencies and technical requirements which made it more economical and less costly to manufacture sensors that are not full format. In the beginning, Nikon has delivered DX sensors with a conversion factor of 1.5. Canon, on its side, has made APS-C sensors on its amateurs range (conversion factor of 1.6) and even APS-H (conversion factor of 1.3) on some SLR of the Pro range (e.g. EOS 1D Mark IV). Some have seen in the non full frame sensor a major advantage. Indeed, an optical of 200mm behaved like a focal of 320mm, all this with the help of APS-C sensor alone. But what was interesting upstream proved more difficult in the other direction. It was not wise enough for a 16mm to become a 26mm. Full format also affects other parameters such as the depth of field, the quality of the image and its dynamics and leads to a more demanding range of optics.

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last comments
Jozef
Jozef

As a Nikon D3s shooter I was about to choose D810 for a second camera for weddings. Well since the…
Spanky
Spanky

I think we need to seperate our love and passion for these truly more capable devices, from our all to…

  • July 8, 2017

Nikon D7500 vs. Nikon D500: what’s the difference?

With the announcement of the D7500 and Nikon’s intentions of retaining the D7200 in their product catalog, choosing a professional APS-C DX reflex camera has become more difficult. So, Nikon D7500 or Nikon D500, which one should you choose? Listed here are the main differences between these two devices as well as a comparison chart to help you make up your mind.

Nikon D7500 or Nikon D500: Which Nikon DX should you choose?

By announcing the Nikon D7500, Nikon was satisfying the demands of users interested in a professional device with an ergonomic design (see the test of the Nikon D500) as well as those users interested in a lighter, more compact device that is as capable as any other.

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  • July 6, 2017

Best Full Frame DSLR Camera 2017 Buying Guide (Cheapest and professional Canon, Nikon, Sony DSLR)

After having discussed the best models of APS-C DSLR cameras, here is our buyer’s guide for digital full frame models.

Full frame cameras have a 24×36 mm format sensor which provides superior image quality; they are also built to provide good long-term performance. This past year, no revolutionary technology has been released as far as full frame cameras are concerned, except for the fact that sensors without low-pass filters have become a standard feature. There is however a race going on, a race for increased performance and Nikon is currently offering no fewer than five full frame DSLR cameras! Competition is fierce and it is leading to the development of ever more powerful cameras.

Why buy a full frame DSLR camera?

Before presenting the different available models, let’s take another look at the characteristics that make full frame DSLR cameras so interesting.

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  • July 3, 2017

Best APS-C Camera 2017 Buying Guide(Entry-level, Mid-level and professional)

Are you in the market for a DSLR camera? This buyer’s guide is dedicated to the best entry-level, mid-level and professional APS-C DSLR cameras available at the moment.

Centerpiece of photography, the DSLR camera is the go-to camera for demanding photographers. These last few years, and despite the competition from hybrid cameras, digital DSLR cameras have continued to evolve by focusing on image quality and versatility, thanks to an ever increasing selection of available lenses.

Why buy a DSLR camera?

DSLR cameras are still the most well regarded cameras by any serious photographer because of the considerable advantages that they offer over other types of devices. Their continuous development over the last few years has transformed DSLR cameras into tried and true devices with better autonomy and longevity (this last factor varies depending on the product level).

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  • May 12, 2017

AF-C, AF-S, AF-A, 9 points, 21 points,51 points, 3D tracking…: what autofocus mode and zone to choose

The choice of autofocus mode is one of the subjects which appears most often among the readers’ questions. What mode should I choose? Why? Why are my photos blurry?

Here is a description of the main Nikon autofocus modes: AF-S, AF-C and AF-A. Below you will also find a description of the main AF zone detection modes. The Nikon D5600’s AF module is one of the most complex to use.

autofocus modeHave you already mastered the shooting modes, but are still having difficulty with the autofocus modes? Without learning a minimum about the AF module, this is only normal; everything will become clear once you have understood how the AF module works.

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  • May 10, 2017

Nikon D5500 vs. D5600 vs. D7200 vs. D3400, what’s the difference?

We spent two weeks field testing the Nikon D5600 which was more than enough time to get acquainted with all of the features of this Nikon reflex camera designed for amateur photo enthusiasts.

The Nikon D5600 is an APS-C reflex camera which fills the gap between the limited entry-level D3400 and the professional D7500 model which is more ergonomic, but also more expensive.

As a result, the Nikon D5600 occupies a prime position within the Nikon DX product line and is geared towards amateur photographers who are looking for a powerful camera, capable of taking high-quality video sequences without the need to invest as much as it would cost to purchase one of the higher category D7200/D7500 or D500 models.

Nikon D5600

The device equipped with the Nikon AF-P 18-55mm f/3.6-5.6 G ED VR zoom

As with all the other tests, I conducted the testing of the Nikon D5600 in different shooting conditions. I am giving you my personal opinion after having tested the device and I am presenting a selection of the photos taken during testing.

Presentation of the device

The Nikon D5600 has taken over for the Nikon D5500. This new version of Nikon’s amateur photographer reflex camera only adds one new features: SnapBridge – which allows for the automatic transfer of photos to a smartphone as well as automatic geo-tracking. As with the Nikon D3400, this upgrade is a modest one.

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  • April 27, 2017

The Best lenses for your Nikon DSLR Camera 2017

Building the ideal equipment of lenses in which you will rely on during your adventure as a photographer can be difficult, not just because of the large number of options and alternatives available, but also because of the diverse amount of technical details, numbers and nomenclatures that they present.

For instance, Nikon offers more than 200 alternatives in its own lens range called Nikkor, which are meant to allow you to transform the picture you visualize in your mind into a real one. Each of these lenses is designed for a particular type of photography.

If you do a web search or directly investigate a little on the manufacturer’s website, you will realize how difficult is for an amateur photographer to build an ideal lens equipment.

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